Tuesday October 20 2015

130801-dailydevovisuals-tues

Scripture: Matthew 11:25-30

Key verses: (28-30) Jesus said, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Reflection: In a sense, we are all weary and overburdened. In the words of this passage Christ welcomes us in our vulnerability and brokenness. He is not afraid of our burdens. “Come to me,” he says, and takes upon himself what hurts us in ourselves. I want to rest in that burden-free moment. Many stay here forgetting to read a bit further. Our shoulders do not remain empty for long. Once we have entrusted our burden to Christ he gives us another one which seems to be even heavier.

Jesus uses the word yoke. I don’t believe this is just an image for a new chore, but instead a symbol of much more. A yoke is a large piece of wood which connects two oxen to plow or to tow something. Jesus is telling us that we are moving from a solitary effort to a common effort. We are connected to one another and with God.

Not only is God unafraid of our brokenness, God invites us to join in the great work being done in the world. This task is not one that we can do alone, no matter how hard we try. When I go at life alone, I get so caught up in my own preoccupations that I forget everybody else or, even worse, become a burden to them. Listening to Jesus’ words we are called instead to unburden ourselves of our own worries and to accept Christ’s hopes and concerns in their place. It is still a task or a burden to carry, but you will find that it actually lightens our load.

Prayer: God, may my work today be kingdom work. Please take my burdens so that I may offer my shoulders for you. In Jesus name I pray. Amen.

Author: Michelle Thomas-Bush

[Scripture quotations are from New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989 National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved].

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s